Gold, obverse, early proof strike, 1 1/16 inch (2.7 cm.) diameter,
The American Numismatic Society, New York


Gold, reverse, early proof strike, 1 1/16 inch (2.7 cm.) diameter,
The American Numismatic Society, New York

Ten-Dollar Gold Piece, 1906-7

The original design for the ten-dollar gold piece had both the obverse and reverse in high relief. The standing eagle was inspired by Saint-Gaudens’design for the Roosevelt inaugural medal of 1905, and the Indian headdress was included by special request of President Roosevelt. Roosevelt stood by the sculptor's decision to remove "In God We Trust" from the design for the coin's obverse, writing, "to put such a motto on coins...not only does no good but...is in effect...dangerously close to sacrilege." Henry Hering did much of the modeling of the coin. The first of the ten-dollar gold piece coins were struck in September of 1907, just after Saint-Gaudens’death in August. In 1908, Congress passed an act requiring "In God We Trust" to be restored on the coin.